Mary Ann Shinnick, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, CCNS

Associate Adjunct Professor, Director of Simulation

Location: 3-956 Factor Bldg

Phone: (310) 794-4219

Email: mshinnic@sonnet.ucla.edu

Overview

"Simulation involves the use of technologically advanced manikins staged in common, realistic clinical events to allow all levels of nursing students a safe opportunity to apply knowledge, skills and attitudes before practicing in the clinical setting. The simulation environment is both a learning and testing setting with the goal of training safe practitioners.

An Associate Adjunct Professor, Dr. Mary Ann Shinnick serves as UCLA School of Nursing’s director of the Simulation and Skills Lab. As a researcher, she investigates the efficacy of human patient simulation as a teaching methodology both in and outside of UCLA. Her research has shown knowledge gain differences between simulation components, effects on self-efficacy and critical thinking and the influence on learning style on knowledge outcomes after simulation. Dr. Shinnick serves on state and national simulation research committees and has won publication awards for her research. Currently, Dr. Shinnick is investigating the use of eye-tracking technology in simulation to learn ways to better educate nurses and develop a valid assessment mechanism for both simulation and the clinical setting. Her work plays a critical role in patient safety, as the development of valid assessment strategies ensures safe practitioners.

Areas of Scholarly Expertise and Interest

Simulation, nursing education, eye-tracking technology, nursing simulation, nursing assessment

Faculty Research and Clinical Expertise

Research: Impact of simulation on nursing education

2016-2017  Validation of a Method to Objectively Assess Clinical Performance

2013-14 Comparison of Novice and Expert Nurses using Eye Tracking Technology in the Simulated Environment

2013-2015 Josiah Macey Jr. research grant with the UCLA School of Medicine on developing “Innovative Tools for Interprofessional Competency” (co-I)

2012   Knowledge and Skill Transference to the Clinical Setting using Human Patient Simulation in Prelicensure Nursing Students.

2011   Enhancing ICU Patient Safety Using Human Patient Simulation to Train New Graduate Nurses.

2010   Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge. (Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles)

  Clinical: Critical Care, Acute Care NP, CNS

Courses

N197 (F2010), N217 (W2011)

N162D (F2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017)

N465D (W2014, F2015, 2016, 2017)

Professional Activities

Society for Simulation in Healthcare: (Member; Research Committee Member)

International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning: (Member; Research Committee Member)

California Simulation Collaborative: (Co-Chair Research Committee)

American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Education

Pasadena City College, Pasadena, 1983 AA Nursing

California State Univ. Dominquez Hills 1985 BS Nursing

University of California, Los Angeles 1992 MN/CNS

University of California, Los Angeles 1995 Post-Master’s FNP

University of California, Los Angeles 2010 PhD

Honors and Awards

2009 Sigma Theta Tau Scholarship for Doctoral Research, Gamma Tau Chapter

2009 Undergraduate Faculty of the Year-School of Nursing at California State University, Los Angeles

2010 UCLA School of Nursing Research Day Poster Award, "Best Design"

2010 Undergraduate Faculty of the Year-School of Nursing at California State University, Los Angeles

2012 Research Article of the Year, “Debriefing: The most important component in Simulation?” Clinical Simulation in Nursing.

2014 Research Article of the Year, “Does nursing student self-efficacy correlate to knowledge when using human patient simulation?” Clinical Simulation in Nursing.

Publications

Shinnick, MA, Holmes, L. Coronary artery disease and homocysteine: A Case Study. American Journal of Critical Care, 1999; Vol 8, (3); 193-196.

Shinnick, MA. Recognition of Scuba Diving Accidents and the Importance of Oxygen First Aid. Journal of Emergency Nursing 1994; 20:105-10.

Shinnick, MA. ARDS in the Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patient: A Case Study. Critical Care Nurse, 1992, 12, 4; 12-17

Evangelista, L. & Shinnick, MA. What do we know about adherence and self-care? Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 2008. Vol 23 (3), pp. 250-257.

Shinnick, MA, Woo, MA, Mentes, J. (2011). “Human Patient Simulation: State of the science in prelicensure nursing education”. J Nurs Educ, Feb; 50(2): 65-72.

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M., Horwich, T.B., & Steadman, R. (2011). Debriefing: The most important component in simulation? Clin Sim in Nurs, 7(3), e105-e111.*Research Article of the Year

Shinnick MA, Woo M, Evangelista LS. (2012). Predictors of Knowledge Gains Using Simulation in the Education of Prelicensure Nursing Students. Journal of Professional Nursing; 28:41-7.

Schultz, M., Shinnick, MA. & Judson, L. (2012).  Learning from mistakes in a simulated nursing leadership laboratory. CIN 30: 456–462. 

Shinnick, MA, & Woo, M. A. (2013). The effect of human patient simulation on critical thinking and its predictors in prelicensure nursing students. Nurse Education Today, 33(9), 1062-1067.

Shinnick, M & Woo, M. (2014) “Does nursing student self-efficacy correlate to knowledge when using human patient simulation?” Clinical Simulation in Nursing, (10), e71-e79. Research Article of the Year.

Shinnick, MA. & Woo, M. (2015) Learning Style Impact on Knowledge Gains in Human Patient Simulation. Nurse Education Today 35, pp. 63-67.  DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.05.013.

Shinnick, M.A. (2016). Validating eye tracking as an objective assessment tool in simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 12 (10), 438-446. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2016.06.001

Shinnick, M. (2015). Annotated Bibliography. In M. Shinnick, J. McCrary, & L. Bowman-Carpio (Eds.), Compendium of assessment tools. Los Angeles, CA: David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine.

 

Shinnick, M. (2015). Interprofessional OSCE. In M. Shinnick, J. McCrary, & L. Bowman-Carpio (Eds.), Compendium of assessment tools. Los Angeles, CA: David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine.

Abstracts

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M. Do Gains in Self-Efficacy Translate to Gains in Knowledge in Nursing Students?  Simulation in Healthcare (2009).  Vol. 4 (4), 289.

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M. Debriefing, the Most Important Component of Simulation? The International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (2010).

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M.  Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge: Study Results. Western Institute for Nursing (2010).

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M.  Debriefing: the Most Important Component in Simulation? Western Institute for Nursing (2010).

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M. The Effect of High Fidelity Simulation on Critical Thinking. The International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (2011).

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M. Learning Style Impact on Knowledge Gains in High Fidelity Simulation. The International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare (2011).

Shinnick, MA, Woo, M. Predictors of Knowledge Gains Using Simulation in the Education of Pre-licensure Nursing Students.  Simulation in Healthcare (2012) 6; 381.

Shinnick, MA. & Woo, M. Correlation between knowledge gains after human patient simulation and preceptor evaluation of ICU new graduate nurses clinical performance. Simulation in Healthcare (2012) 7: 471.

Shinnick, MA & Woo, M. Simulation dosing: Once may be enough. Presented San Diego, CA; Published Society for Simulation in Healthcare (2013) (8) 6; 594.

Shinnick, MA., Woo, M. & Kumar, R. Compromised Blood Brain Barrier Function in Patients with Heart Failure. Presented Athens, Greece; Published European Journal of Heart Failure (2014) 16(s2): 282-283.

Shinnick, MA. Validity of Eye Tracking as an Assessment Tool in Simulation. Presented in San Diego, CA. Simulation in Healthcare (2015) 10 (6): 453.

Shinnick, M. Predictors of Effective Nursing Performance in a Clinical Simulation. Presenting in Orlando, FL, Jan 2017. International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare.